Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Fall Contests & Competitions


Tucson Festival of Books: Literary Awards
Deadline: 
October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$20
Cash Prize: 
$1,000

Three prizes of $1,000 each are given annually for works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The winners will also be invited to take part in a panel discussion at the annual Tucson Festival of Books and attend a workshop on the University of Arizona campus in March 2018. Using the online submission system, submit five poems of any length or a short story, essay, or excerpt from a novel or memoir of up to 5,000 words with a $20 entry fee by October 31. Visit the website for complete guidelines.
Tucson Festival of Books, Literary Awards, P.O. Box 855, Cortaro, AZ 85652. Meg Files, Director.


Southeast Missouri State University Press
Deadline: 
November 1, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$30
Cash Prize: 
$2,000

A prize of $2,000 and publication by Southeast Missouri State University Press is given annually for a novel, a novella, or a collection of linked stories by a U.S. writer who has not published a novel. Submit a manuscript of any length with a $30 entry fee by November 1. Visit the website for complete guidelines.
Southeast Missouri State University Press, Nilsen Literary Prize, 1 University Plaza, Mail Stop 2650, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701. James Brubaker, Publisher.

Fiction Collective Two: Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest
Deadline:
November 1, 2017
Entry Fee:
$25
Cash Prize:
$1,500

A prize of $1,500 and publication by Fiction Collective Two is given annually for a short story collection, novella, novella collection, or novel. U.S. writers who have not previously published a book with Fiction Collective Two are eligible. Noy Holland will judge. Using the online submission system, submit a manuscript of any length with a brief bio and a $25 entry fee by November 1. Visit the website for complete guidelines.
Fiction Collective Two, Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest, University of Alabama Press, P.O. Box 870380, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. (773) 702-7000.

Gabriele Rico Challenge in Creative Nonfiction
Deadline: 
November 1, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$15
Cash Prize: 
$1,333
A prize of $1,333 and publication in Reed Magazine is given annually for an essay. Using the online submission system, submit an essay of up to 5,000 words with a $15 entry fee, which includes a copy of the prize issue, by November 1. All entries are considered for publication. Visit the website for complete guidelines.
Reed Magazine, Gabriele Rico Challenge in Creative Nonfiction, San José State University, English Department, One Washington Square, San José, CA 95192. (408) 924-4425.
Reed Magazine: John Steinbeck Fiction Award

Deadline: 
November 1, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$15
Cash Prize: 
$1,000

A prize of $1,000 and publication in Reed Magazine is given annually for a short story. Using the online submission system, submit a story of up to 5,000 words with a $15 entry fee, which includes a copy of the prize issue, by November 1. All entries are considered for publication. Visit the website for complete guidelines.
Reed Magazine, John Steinbeck Fiction Award, San José State University, English Department, One Washington Square, San José, CA 95192. (408) 924-4425.

Writer's Digest: Short Short Story Competition
Deadline: 
November 15, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$25
Cash Prize: 
$3,000

A prize of $3,000, publication in Writer's Digest, and an all-expenses-paid trip to the Writer's Digest Conference in New York City is given annually for a short short story. A second-place prize of $1,500 and publication is also awarded. Using the online submission system, submit a story of up to 1,500 words with a $25 entry fee ($20 for each additional entry) by November 15, or with a $30 entry fee ($25 for each additional entry) by December 15. Visit the website for the required entry form and complete guidelines.

Writer's Digest
, Short Short Story Competition, 10151 Carver Road, Suite 200, Blue Ash, OH 45242. 

Ruminate: VanderMey Nonfiction Prize
Deadline: 
November 15, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$20
Cash Prize: 
$1,500

A prize of $1,500 and publication in Ruminate is given annually for a work of creative nonfiction. Using the online submission system, submit an essay or short memoir of up to 5,500 words with a $20 entry fee, which includes a copy of the prize issue, by November 15. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Ruminate
, VanderMey Nonfiction Prize, 1041 North Taft Hill Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521. Brianna Van Dyke, Editor in Chief.

Pushcart Press: Editors’ Book Award
Deadline: 
November 15, 2017
Cash Prize: 
$1,000
Website: 


A prize of $1,000 is given occasionally for a fiction or nonfiction manuscript that has been rejected by a commercial publisher. The award recognizes “worthy manuscripts that have been overlooked by today's high-pressure, bottom-line publishing conglomerates.” Manuscripts must be submitted with a formal letter of nomination from an editor at a U.S. or Canadian publishing company by November 15. There is no entry fee. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Pushcart Press, Editors’ Book Award, P.O. Box 380, Wainscott, NY 11975. (631) 324-9300. Bill Henderson, President.
Nowhere Magazine: Travel Writing Contest
Deadline: 
December 15, 2017
Entry Fee: 
$20
Cash Prize: 
$1,000
Website: 


A prize of $1,000 and publication in Nowhere Magazine is given twice yearly for a short story or essay that "possesses a powerful sense of place." Porter Fox will judge. Unpublished and published pieces that have not already been chosen as a contest winner are eligible. Using the online submission system, submit a story or essay of 800 to 5,000 words with a $20 entry fee by December 15. All entries are considered for publication. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Nowhere Magazine
, Travel Writing Contest, 1582 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11213. 
Glimmer Train Press: Family Matters
Deadline: 
January 2, 2018
Entry Fee: 
$18
Cash Prize: 
$2,500
Website: 


A prize of $2,500, publication in Glimmer Train Stories, and 20 copies of the prize issue is given annually for a short story about families of any configuration. Using the online submission system, submit a story of up to 12,000 words with an $18 entry fee by January 2, 2018. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Glimmer Train Press, Family Matters, P.O. Box 80430, Portland, OR 97280. (503) 221-0836. Susan Burmeister-Brown and Linda Swanson-Davies, Coeditors.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Kind Girls Make Strong Women

There are countless lines of donors waiting and willing to give their blood. Food, money and volunteers are pouring in. Moments like these restore the humanity in each of us.

Just a few months ago, my daughters watched the Charlottesville protest in horror. Innocent and a bit naïve, they began selling t-shirts. They can’t save the world but they could at least start a dialogue. In a few short weeks, their t-shirts began showing up across the nation, a few in England and Canada.

I suppose it takes a bit of childlike wonder to make a change. They’ve cleaned parks, visited the unfortunate (and more importantly begun to be more sensitive to each other)…and now they’re organizing a food drive for the hungry.

It’s a simple saying, kind girls make strong women but it sends a powerful message. These girls scrimped and saved to pay for the first shipment of shirts (they don’t make any money on them). They sold lipstick and babysat to make sure they could keep the cost down. But here’s the funny thing, while the world is shaking their head—they’re doubling down, trying to figure out what more they can do.

They can’t do everything or save everyone. But they can do something. And they will.


For upcoming Kind Revolution events, follow them on Instagram (@littlechicksbeautyboutique) or Facebook (Little Chicks Beauty Boutique). To purchase t-shirts click here.

Friday, September 29, 2017

Founded in Fact, Colored with Creativity

We’re down to the last few days before the WOK’s 2017 Fall Writing Contest deadline. Your hands are cramped from countless edits, your neck is tight and your eyes are bloodshot. But now is the time to remember that you, my friend, are not here to tell us about a subject, place or personality.

Your job in Creative Nonfiction is to show us, invite us to the world of your research. Creative Nonfiction reads like fiction. It’s based on fact, on true events or an actual person, idea or problem.

But how it’s presented is the difference between the uninspired and the creative.

Too many authors hold back, rein in their talent because of the intimidating word, nonfiction. But just like fiction, we need scenes. We need stories. They’re just as much the building blocks of a novel as they are of a biography. Or documentary.

It’s the foundation of writing. We’re storytellers first, writers second. Anybody can tie words together. But only an author can pierce us to the very core.

Don’t forget your place in the world, and don’t forget to take us.




Thursday, September 21, 2017

Creative Nonfiction Part Two: Memoir vs Literary Journalism


In Part One, we highlighted the basics of this growing genre—true stories well told. In Part Two we’ll dissect the two main categories of Creative Nonfiction.
Literary Journalism and Memoir
Or in layman terms, public versus private.

Memoir is the writer’s personal story. It’s her story. She alone owns it.

Literary Journalism is someone else’s story. Anybody (technically) could own it—whoever is willing to weave facts into an appetizing story.

Memoir is more of a reality show, think Kim Kardashian. She “bares it all” in her confession videos (splicing the most entertaining parts of her life for entertaining stories/episodes). Politicians, athletes and others grasping for their fifteen minutes of fame are making their private lives public.

And we are obsessed.
From tweets, blogs and books, we want the raw humanity. The literature of reality, with all of the intimate pain and secrets that authors willingly confess. It gives us a sense of connection, a united front in this thing called life.

In contrast, literary fiction centers on an idea or concept. Authors write about something other than themselves. It can be a big idea, or a moment in time or a social problem. It isn’t one person or one family. It’s about humanity on a larger scale, and can be about any subject—from gas prices to immortality. There are no limits to the subject matter as long as it is expressed in a story-oriented, narrative way—in short, as long as it’s well told.

Because they’re so personal, Memoirs can have a limited audience, unlike Literary Journalism where “big idea/factual essays” are more sought after by editors and agents (and will more likely lead to publication).

Memoir tends to be a niche genre while Literary Journalism is for mass consumption. For example, I have no interest in celebrities and their lavish lifestyles. Nor do I have an interest in fast food. But I’d devour a book about the impact McDonald’s has on our nation.
Both pivot on facts, some colored through emotional memories while others through a historical looking glass.

Next up…Creative Nonfiction Part Three: Built on Fact, Colored with Creativity