Wednesday, November 6, 2013

P is for Pitch

An author sits down and writes a pretty book. He, or she, slaps a few lovely words together and ships the manuscript off to an agent or editor. From there it magically becomes a bestseller - right?

Big fat no.

An author writes the novel. And then edits. Again and again. Then the writer dons a sales hat and pitches the book to an agent. How, might you ask, does this go about? The author's pitch is the back cover of the novel. If you can snag an agent, you can snag a reader - if you snag a reader, you can sell the book.

Of course, there are rules. A pitch has to be like a skirt, long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to hook the buyer. The central conflict needs to be revealed as well as the genre. A few agents have expressed the need for authors to compare their book to one or two on the market. It helps agents and editors in categorizing the novel.

In the spirit of masochism, I'm throwing my pitch out there for criticism. I'm offering to reciprocate as well - send a pigeon or shoot me an email.

Drum roll, please...


Unsanctioned love is punishable by death in 1535 England. Rhett Rhyn and Lady Isla Belle are attacked by royal guards seconds after a gypsy seals their souls in a pagan marriage.

Penniless and grief stricken, Rhett buries his new wife along with a secret – his inability to die.

Rhett atones for the true cost of the witch’s ceremony, Isla’s eternal reincarnation. He watches as she is born again and again without the memory of their love.

Four centuries later in her current host, Isla Belle Thorne hungers for recognition in her field of genetic research. Reeling from her father’s abandonment, the only man in her life is the stalwart boy in her vivid dreams – the only place she allows foolish emotions.
 

The unshakeable man from her visions materializes at a fundraising event. Rhett confesses that Isla is the re-embodiment of his late Isla Belle.

Trained by her education to doubt, Isla rejects the mounting evidence. Because of her refusal to acknowledge their history, Rhett decides to cure his unending life.

Isla is forced to trust the gender that betrayed her, or lose the love of all her lives.

DEATH EVERLASTING is a 110,000 word romance with alternating historical and contemporary perspectives – a mixture of Juliet and Life After Life.


8 comments:

Annis Cassells said...

Clarissa. Since this is a genre I don't normally explore, I had to read your pitch twice. On the second go, I was with you until here:

"Isla is forced to trust the gender that betrayed her, or lose the love of all her lives."

I hope this is helpful. Good luck, girlfriend! xoA

Clarissa Kae said...

Thank you, Annis!

Does the sentence just not make sense or too wordy?

Annis Cassells said...

Maybe I'm missing something, Clarissa, but it doesn't make sense to me. Maybe it's that I just don't know the story.

Am I to understand that she was distrustful of men but now she's in love so she has to change her mind?

I hope this helps. xoA

Clarissa Kae said...

Yes, she doesn't trust men but now needs to trust Rhett or lose him. Does that come across, or no?

Donnee Patrese said...

I love the Synopsis! I want to read the rest of the novel. I am no publisher but I am a reader and I would buy it. Good Job.

Donnee Patrese said...

I love the Synopsis! I want to read the rest of the novel. I am no publisher but I am a reader and I would buy it. Good Job.

Clarissa Kae said...

That gives me hope! Thanks.

Davyd Morris said...

I love it. Especially "the love of all of her lives" No, it is not my genre either, but this hooks me. The phrase immediately before it throws me a bit. Distrusting his gender? This must have meaning in the context of the story, but here it seems like a red herring.OK, but is this important in the pitch piece?